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Wednesday, April 23 2014 @ 05:41 AM EDT

Xenia Community Schools News

Central Middle School holds blood draw in appreciation to care given principals son

Right to Read Week celebrated with special events at Shawnee Elementary School

Eight graduates of Xenia High School have earned AP Scholar Awards in recognition of their exceptional achievement on AP Exams


Central Middle School holds blood draw in appreciation to care given principals son

Xenia Community Schools' staff members stepped up to give the gift of life this week  with a blood drive hosted by Central Middle School (CMS). Since 2004, CMS has hosted an annual blood drive that resulted in 131 pints of blood donated in honor of the successful medical care provided to Addison Earley.  Addison is the son of CMS Principal Mike Earley.  Seventeen pints were donated this week with 18 district staff members volunteering to participate.

A.J. Grimm, a University of Dayton intern working Central Middle School counselor Amy Biggs, looks over paperwork while donating blood during the CMS Blood Drive.

 

 

 

 

 

Central Middle School teacher Dana McClain completes her registration paperwork before joining the line to give blood.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Right to Read Week celebrated with special events at Shawnee Elementary School

Health and safety personnel were featured during Xenia Community Schools Right to Read Week with events focused on Reading to the Rescue.  Visiting  illustrators Christopher and Jeanette Canyon of Columbus visited all Xenia elementary schools, as well as St. Brigid and Cedarville University. At Shawnee Elementary School, students and staff celebrated with several special activities to encourage reading for all ages. 

       Posing in front of the handcrafted fire truck in the Shawnee Elementary School Library, Torey  Glenn and Silas Futrell, left to right, don fire hats and play with first responder puppets.  

                                                                                  

 

 

 

Kindergarten students created doctor hats and stethoscopes to celebrate reading.  Students shown include, front row, left to right, Jacob Smith, Zharia Peyton, Nicholas Markland, Anthony Taylor, Jason Day; second row, Mirayah Watson, Alexis Stritenberger, Madalynn Craft, Kristopher Clark, Alexis Edwards, Constance Grooms; third row, Jade Rhodes, Gavin Thomas, Derek Alex and Leeandra Dunlap.

 


Eight graduates of  Xenia High School have earned AP Scholar Awards in recognition of their exceptional achievement on AP Exams

The College Boards Advanced Placement Program (AP) provides willing and academically prepared students with the opportunity to take rigorous college-level courses while still in high school, and to earn college credit, advanced placement, or both for successful performance on the AP Exams.
 
About 18 percent of the more than 1.8 million students worldwide who took AP Exams performed at a sufficiently high level to also earn an AP Scholar Award.

The College Board recognizes several levels of achievement based on students performance on AP Exams.
   
Matthew Burket qualified for the AP Scholar with Distinction Award by earning an average score of at least 3.5 on all AP Exams taken, and scores of 3 or higher on five or more of these exams.
 
Seven students qualified for the AP Scholar Award by completing three or more AP Exams with scores of 3 or higher.  The AP Scholars are Patrick Grieve, Emily Harkleroad, Amanda Holland, Crysta Hutchinson, Brady OCallaghan, Emily Rhodes and Celeste Wheeler.

Through more than 30 different college-level courses and exams, AP provides willing and academically prepared students with the opportunity to earn college credit or advanced placement and stand out in the college admission process.  Each exam is developed by a committee of college and university faculty and AP teachers, ensuring that AP exams are aligned with the same high standards expected by college faculty at some of the nations leading liberal arts and research institutions

 More than 3,800 colleges and universities annually receive AP scores.
Most four-year colleges in the United States provide credit and/or advanced placement for qualifying exam scores.  Research consistently shows that AP students who score a 3 or higher on AP Exams (based on a scale from 1 to 5, with 5 being the
highest) typically experience greater academic success in college and have higher college graduation rates than students who do not participate in AP.

The College Board is a not-for-profit membership association whose mission is to connect students to college success and opportunity.
Founded in 1900, the College Board is composed of more than 5,700 schools, colleges, universities and other educational organizations.
Each year, the College Board serves seven million students and their parents, 23,000 high schools, and 3,800 colleges through major programs and services in college readiness, college admission, guidance, assessment, financial aid and enrollment.
 
Among its widely recognized programs are the SAT, the PSAT/NMSQT, the Advanced Placement Program (AP), SpringBoard and ACCUPLACER. The College Board is committed to the principles of excellence and equity, and that commitment is embodied in all of its programs, services, activities and concerns.
 

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